Real Pseudo-Holidays

It’s the last day of February and the last day of National Haiku Writing Month. This year, it also happens to be a leap year and therefore February’s extra day. In folk stories – it’s Sadie Hawkins Day, a pseudo-holiday based on an old hillbilly comic strip that evolved into the real world practice of Sadie Hawkins dances where the girl gets to ask the guy to dance – early role reversal.

I also use it as Procrastination Day – an extra day put to good use the practice of avoiding a task that needs to get done sooner rather than later. In that vein,  I am putting off working on paying bills in order to write this post – my last for NaHaiWri Mo ~ 2016.

Grateful thanks to all who “liked” my posts and shared your thoughts. And to all readers, writers and lovers of haiku and poetic spell. You are in my heart always.

~

February thaw
the last patch of snow remains
north of my daydreams               (5-7-5 haiku)

Flora and fauna on a Sunday stroll

 

Advertisements

National Haiku Writing Month #1

Hello again. Just when you thought that I was finished with my daily blogging and January’s small stones, I’m back. February has been designated (at least by haiku poets) as National Haiku Writing Month (NaHaiWriMo). This is an appropriate match since February is the shortest month of the year and haiku is the shortest genre of poetry. For the next twenty-nine days (an extra leap year day), I will be posting at least one haiku or senryu daily. Haiku, as related here, are very short one-breath poems that are nature-based or referenced in order to note and share a common experience/observation. Senryu, haiku’s sibling, are one-breath poems that deal more with human nature and foibles. Strict syllable counts are not adhered to, and the 5/7/5 – seventeen syllable structure – will be a rare sighting on these posts.

Traditional or contemporary haiku – ku as they are sometimes referred to – are like compact abstract paintings. It’s the distilled essence of the observation being recorded rather than a full factual account or representation. Less is more.

That being said, there is one traditional 5/7/5 haiku (it just happened to work out) in this first sequence:

~

Sunday morning friends
she hands me my favorite
teacup

~

mulberry patterns
on a porcelain teacup
we speak of old loves

~

spent tea leaves
we wonder who will be the next
steward of the land

IMG_4486